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September 26, 2022 5:56 am

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2:15 PM 11/30/2020 – Featured Posts and Tweets

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 2:15 PM 11/30/2020 – Featured Posts and Tweets
Featured Posts – November 30, 2020
The News And Times Blogs Network – <a href=”http://newsandtimes.net” rel=”nofollow”>newsandtimes.net</a>Confession from the profession: ‘Presstitutes’ in the service of the CIA – People’s World | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Netanyahu held secret meeting with Saudi Crown Prince, Israeli minister confirms | Us World News | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Nuke chief killed with Israeli weapons controlled by satellite – Iranian report | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
It’s time to end the farce of this government | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Ex-journalist Safronov charged with treason to remain detained until March | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
mikenov on Twitter: Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services
Puerto Rico should be state instead of territory – The Hawkeye | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Progressives don’t love Joe Biden’s foreign policy — but there’s a lot to like | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Time for Moscow to Move on and Stop Thinking so Much About Washington | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Germany, Japan and South Korea defy US over Huawei ban: report | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Iran says Israel remotely killed military nuclear scientist – The Associated Press | My News Links – mynewslinks.com | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
The “Cooties Theory” of Criticism | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Europe must step up on defense, German Greens leader says – POLITICO | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Iran says Israel remotely killed military nuclear scientist | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Rethinking lone-wolf extremism – Samuel Bezzina | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Opinion | 1918 Germany Has a Warning for America | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince nominated for 2021 Nobel Peace Prize | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
FBI Reports 2020 Rise in Violence | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Biden widens search for defense secretary under pressure from his party | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Of minks, rats, and (some G) men: Michael Novakhov: The Hypothesis: Did COVID-19 originate on the mink farms? Are the Green Party, the Mob-TOC, and the New Abwehr behind it? | See also the related subject: Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com

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2:15 PM 11/30/2020 – Featured Posts and Tweets | My News Links – mynewslinks.com

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2:15 PM 11/30/2020 – Featured Posts and Tweets

Featured Posts – November 30, 2020

The News And Times Blogs Network – <a href=”http://newsandtimes.net” rel=”nofollow”>newsandtimes.net</a> | Audio Posts in English
Confession from the profession: ‘Presstitutes’ in the service of the CIA – People’s World | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Netanyahu held secret meeting with Saudi Crown Prince, Israeli minister confirms | Us World News | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Nuke chief killed with Israeli weapons controlled by satellite – Iranian report | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
It’s time to end the farce of this government | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Ex-journalist Safronov charged with treason to remain detained until March | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
mikenov on Twitter: Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services
Puerto Rico should be state instead of territory – The Hawkeye | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Progressives don’t love Joe Biden’s foreign policy — but there’s a lot to like | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Time for Moscow to Move on and Stop Thinking so Much About Washington | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Germany, Japan and South Korea defy US over Huawei ban: report | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Iran says Israel remotely killed military nuclear scientist – The Associated Press | My News Links – mynewslinks.com | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
The “Cooties Theory” of Criticism | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Europe must step up on defense, German Greens leader says – POLITICO | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Iran says Israel remotely killed military nuclear scientist | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Rethinking lone-wolf extremism – Samuel Bezzina | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Opinion | 1918 Germany Has a Warning for America | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince nominated for 2021 Nobel Peace Prize | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
FBI Reports 2020 Rise in Violence | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Biden widens search for defense secretary under pressure from his party | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Of minks, rats, and (some G) men: Michael Novakhov: The Hypothesis: Did COVID-19 originate on the mink farms? Are the Green Party, the Mob-TOC, and the New Abwehr behind it? | See also the related subject: Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services | Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ – michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com

 

11.30.20


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Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

Of minks, rats, and (some G) men: Michael Novakhov: The Hypothesis: Did COVID-19 originate on the mink farms? Are the Green Party, the Mob-TOC, and the New Abwehr behind it? | See also the related subject: Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services

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Of minks, rats, and (some G) men: Michael Novakhov: The Hypothesis: Did COVID-19 originate on the mink farms? Are the Green Party, the Mob-TOC, and the New Abwehr behind it? | See also the related subject: Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services

9:36 AM 11/30/2020

Michael Novakhov: The Hypothesis: Did COVID-19 originate on the mink farms? Are the Green Party, the Mob-TOC, and the New Abwehr behind it? 

What does it have to do with rats? They eat dead mink and spread the infection, hypothetically. 

FBI: Do you investigate this quite obvious and logical hypothesis or do you hide, do not seek anything, und just snooze a lot, as usually?

See also the related subject: 

Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services – Google Search 

google.com/search?q=Psych… pic.twitter.com/ZLQGowaez6


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7442838Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites)

Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services – Google Search

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Current Headlines

Michael Novakhov SharedNewsLinks michaelnovakhov-sharednewslinks.com
Biden widens search for defense secretary under pressure from his party
FBI Reports 2020 Rise in Violence
Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince nominated for 2021 Nobel Peace Prize
Germanys confirmed coronavirus cases rise by 11,169: RKI
Opinion | 1918 Germany Has a Warning for America
Rethinking lone-wolf extremism Samuel Bezzina
Iran says Israel remotely killed military nuclear scientist
Europe must step up on defense, German Greens leader says POLITICO
The Cooties Theory of Criticism
Iran says Israel remotely killed military nuclear scientist The Associated Press | My News Links mynewslinks.com
Germany, Japan and South Korea defy US over Huawei ban: report
Time for Moscow to Move on and Stop Thinking so Much About Washington
Progressives dont love Joe Bidens foreign policy  but theres a lot to like
Puerto Rico should be state instead of territory The Hawkeye
Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): mikenov on Twitter: Psychopathology of Intelligence and Security Services Google Search google.com/search?q=Psych pic.twitter.com/ZLQGowaez6 | My News Links mynewslinks.com
Netanyahu held secret meeting with Saudi Crown Prince, Israeli minister confirms | Us World News
Ex-journalist Safronov charged with treason to remain detained until March
Its time to end the farce of this government
Nuke chief killed with Israeli weapons controlled by satellite Iranian report
Confession from the profession: Presstitutes in the service of the CIA Peoples World
News Review: All Saved And Shared Stories
Retired Admiral Says Hes Very Concerned About Trump Loyalists at Pentagon During Biden Transition
Trump Claims FBI And Justice Department May Have Helped Rig Election
Opinion | Trump Looms Large Now, but Maybe Not Forever
9:45 AM 11/29/2020 Tweets by @mikenov: Cuomo: This Is the Year Marijuana Finally Gets Legalized in New York | My News Links mynewslinks.com

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    LAST NIGHT: Joe Biden gives a thumbs up after receiving a CT scan. http://hill.cm/8AwhdRA 

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Biden widens search for defense secretary under pressure from his party

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ADD AUSTIN TO THE LIST: The short list for Joe Biden’s defense secretary is getting longer. Once described as a shoo-in, former Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Michele Flournoy is facing new competition from at least three other candidates.

The latest potential candidate is retired Army Gen. Lloyd Austin, former head of the U.S. Central Command, who, if selected, would need a congressional waiver from the law that requires a seven-year waiting period for retired officers to serve as the civilian leader of the Pentagon. Former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis easily won a waiver in 2017.

Other candidates in the mix include Jeh Johnson, former secretary of homeland security; Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, former deputy secretary of energy; and Illinois Sen. Tammy Duckworth, a combat veteran who was a vocal supporter of Biden during the election.

FLOURNOY STILL A TOP CANDIDATE: Flournoy’s corporate ties have drawn fire from progressive Democrats. She serves on the boards of Booz Allen Hamilton and Amida Technology Solutions and is the chief executive officer of WestExec Advisor, a high-powered Washington consulting firm founded in 2017 by Tony Blinken, Biden’s choice for secretary of state.

But her pro-war policies have also been questioned by Democrats. “Flournoy supported the war in Iraq & Libya, criticized Obama on Syria, and helped craft the surge in Afghanistan,” tweeted California Rep. Ro Khanna last week. “I want to support the President’s picks. But will Flournoy now commit to a full withdrawal from Afghanistan & a ban on arms sales to the Saudis to end the Yemen war?”

‘SO FAR IT’S NOT GOOD’: Biden is also under pressure to appoint more blacks to his Cabinet. Last week in an interview, South Carolina Rep. James Clyburn, who many credit with rescuing Biden’s flagging primary campaign, expressed disappointment that so far only one Biden nominee, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, is black.

“From all I hear, black people have been given fair consideration,” Clyburn told Juan Williams, a columnist for the Hill. “But there is only one black woman so far. I want to see where the process leads to, what it produces,” he added. “But so far, it’s not good.”

Both Austin and Johnson are black.

Good Monday and welcome to Jamie McIntyre’s Daily on Defense, written and compiled by Washington Examiner National Security Senior Writer Jamie McIntyre (@jamiejmcintyre) and edited by Victor I. Nava. Email here with tips, suggestions, calendar items, and anything else. Sign up or read current and back issues at DailyonDefense.com. If signing up doesn’t work, shoot us an email and we’ll add you to our list. And be sure to follow us on Twitter: @dailyondefense.

Subscribe today to the Washington Examiner magazine and get Washington Briefing: politics and policy stories that will keep you up to date with what’s going on in Washington. SUBSCRIBE NOW: Just $1.00 an issue!

HAPPENING TODAY: President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will receive their first Presidential Daily Briefing, which presumably will include the latest intelligence about Iran’s threatened retaliation for the assassination Friday of its top nuclear scientist, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh.

“Iran will surely respond to the martyrdom of our scientist at the proper time,” Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said Saturday during a televised Cabinet meeting.

“Fakhrizadeh was at the heart of the Iranian nuclear program and has been for years, not only the brains but also the passion behind it. So his assassination is really a significant event, not unlike a year ago when we took out Soleimani,” said former Joint Chiefs Chairman retired Adm. Mike Mullen on NBC’s Meet the Press yesterday. “It’s a real, real center of gravity, if you will, for that program. That doesn’t mean there aren’t other nuclear scientists or that Iran can’t continue on.”

“I’m hopeful that President-elect Biden can actually reach in and calm the waters, but I think this heightens tension significantly,” Mullen said.

McRAVEN: ‘THEY HAVE TO RETALIATE’: “Iran either suspects or knows that Israel was responsible for this attack. And then, of course, kind of by association, they’re going to assume that we either collaborated with it or at a minimum were witting of the Israeli’s actions,” said retired Adm. William McRaven on ABC Sunday.

“The Iranians are going to be in a position where they have to retaliate. I don’t see any way around it. They’re going to have to save face. And so now the issue becomes, what does that retaliation look like?” said McRaven, the former commander of U.S. Special Operations Command. “The Iranians don’t want to war with us. We don’t want to go to war with Iran. So everybody needs to do the best they can to kind of lower the temperature and try not to get this into an escalation mode.”

NO VOTES WERE SWITCHED: The lifelong Republican fired by President Trump for challenging his assertions of election fraud told the CBS program 60 Minutes that the American people should have 100% confidence in their vote.

“We can go on and on with all the farcical claims that — alleging — interference in the 2020 election, but the proof is in the ballots. The recounts are consistent with the initial count, and to me, that’s further evidence, that’s confirmation that the systems used in the 2020 election performed as expected,” Chris Krebs, who was put in charge of the agency handling election security by Trump two years ago, told CBS’s Scott Pelley.

“Votes were cast in Georgia, for instance, again, on paper. They were counted by a machine. They were subsequently recounted by hand. The outcomes of that count were consistent. If there was an algorithm that was flipping votes or changing votes, it didn’t work. I think the more likely explanation, though, is that there is no algorithm, that the systems performed as intended,” Krebs said. “There is no foreign power that is flipping votes. There’s no domestic actor flipping votes. I did it right. We did it right. This was a secure election.”

TRUMP INCENSED, INSISTENT HE WON: Immediately after the broadcast, Trump fired back on Twitter. “@60Minutes never asked us for a comment about their ridiculous, one sided story on election security, which is an international joke,” he tweeted. “Our 2020 Election, from poorly rated Dominion to a Country FLOODED with unaccounted for Mail-In ballots, was probably our least secure EVER!”

In his first interview since Biden was declared the winner, Trump told Fox News’s Maria Bartiromo that ballots were trucked in for Biden, while his were dumped. “You know, they threw away ballots. They threw away many Trump ballots. That’s the easiest way they could cheat. But we got 74 million votes. He didn’t get anywhere close to 80 million votes,” Trump said.

“This election was over. And then they did dumps. They call them dumps, big, massive dumps, in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and all over,” Trump said. “And they did these massive dumps of votes. And, all of a sudden, I went from winning by a lot to losing by a little.”

Asked by Bartiromo if he could prove that, Trump replied, “I’m going to use 125% of my energy to do it,” but he complained the legal system is rigged against him, too. “You need a judge that’s willing to hear a case. You need a Supreme Court that’s willing to make a real big decision,” he said,

“It’s not like you’re going to change my mind. In other words, my mind will not change in six months.”

AFGHANISTAN STUDY GROUP: President Trump’s order to reduce U.S. troop presence in Afghanistan is drawing a warning from the Afghanistan Study Group, which includes former Joint Chiefs Chairman retired Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford.

“Americans generally agree that it is time to end this war. But withdrawing U.S. troops irresponsibly would likely lead to a new civil war, inviting the reconstitution of anti-U.S. terrorist groups and providing them with a narrative of victory against the U.S. superpower,” writes Dunford in an op-ed, along with co-chairs Kelly Ayotte, a former Republican senator from New Hampshire, and Nancy Lindborg, former president and CEO of the U.S. Institute of Peace

“An abrupt withdrawal of U.S. troops, as is now being contemplated by the Trump administration, would undermine the fragile but potentially transformational peace process. It would embolden the Taliban, destabilize the Kabul government and allow terrorist groups to reconsolidate,” they write. “A civil war could result, provoking a wider regional conflict and an inevitable humanitarian and migration crisis.”

PLAYING POLITICS? House Armed Services Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Smith is accusing the Air Force of politicizing the announcement of their preferred locations for Air National Guard C-130J main operating bases.

“The Air Force has traditionally avoided making basing announcements near an election so as not to be accused of playing politics with force structure decisions. In this instance, the timing and decision to include Savannah, Ga. in the announcement, when Georgia is focused on Senate runoff elections, raises questions about the Secretary’s motives,” Smith said in a statement last week. “The Air Force did not need to make this decision now – plain and simple – and should delay moving forward with these basing actions until conference negotiations have concluded and the decision is not at risk of being politicized.”

BIDEN’S FIRST SLIP-UP: According to a pool report, Biden slipped yesterday while playing with his dog, Major. What was first reported as a twisted ankle turned out to be a fractured foot.

“Initial X-rays did not show any obvious fracture, but his clinical exam warranted more detailed imaging,” said Dr. Kevin O’Connor, director, executive medicine, GW Medical Faculty Associates. “Follow-up CT scan confirmed hairline (small) fractures of President-elect Biden’s lateral and intermediate cuneiform bones, which are in the mid-foot. It is anticipated that he will likely require a walking boot for several weeks.”

ACCIDENTAL DEATH: The Pentagon says Air Force Capt. Kelliann Leli, 30, of Parlin, New Jersey, died Nov. 27 in a “non-combat related vehicle incident” at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates.

Leli, a medical doctor, was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel in Afghanistan. She was assigned to the 60th Healthcare Operations Squadron, Travis Air Force Base, California.

The Rundown

Washington Examiner: US affirms ‘Taiwan’s freedom and independence’ despite China’s sovereignty claims

Washington Examiner: Biden’s national security adviser nominee vows to put China on notice after pandemic

Washington Examiner: Robert Mueller set to appear in first interview since Russia investigation

Washington Examiner: Top cybersecurity official fired by Trump says he was most upset he didn’t get to say goodbye to team

Washington Examiner: The space weather experts who give the go-ahead on when to launch and avoid disaster

Washington Examiner: Opinion: Iran threatens Biden with nuclear buildup over Israel assassination

Washington Examiner: 5 takeaways from Israel’s assassination of Iran’s top nuclear weapons scientist

AP: Acting U.S. Defense Secretary Visits Troops In Rare Visit To Somalia

Military.com: Carrier Nimitz Returns to Gulf as Iran Makes Threats

New York Times: Iran Struggles For a Response To Bold Strikes

Washington Post: Turkey’s military campaign beyond its borders is powered by homemade armed drones

Task & Purpose: The Marine Corps Is On The Hunt For A Kamikaze Drone Swarm To Back Up Grunts On The Battlefield

Washington Post: The United States has closed at least 10 bases around Afghanistan. But drawdown details remain murky.

The Daily Beast: How Russian Disinformation Protects Violent Wagner Group Mercenaries in Africa

New York Times: Afghan Leader Hampers Peace Talks, Officials Say

South China Morning Post: Joe Biden Presidency Could Reopen A Window Of Opportunity For China: Analysts

Wall Street Journal: Biden’s Goodwill Sparks Debate Among NATO Allies

AP: Biden’s Win Means Some Guantanamo Prisoners May Be Released

New York Times: How Did the North Korean Defector Cross the Border? Loose Screws

Washington Times: ‘Fort Trump’ In Poland Dismissed As Military Goal

19fortyfive.com: Why India Is So Close To Russia’s Navy

Washington Post: Opinion: An abrupt U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan undermines the fragile peace

Calendar

MONDAY | NOVEMBER 30

7 a.m. — NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg briefs reporters ahead of the meeting of the NATO foreign ministers, taking place via teleconference Dec. 1-2.

10:30 a.m. — Carnegie Endowment for International Peace webinar: “Taking Stock: Five Years of Russia’s Intervention in Syria,” with Jomana Qaddour, nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council; Dmitri Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center; Frances Brown, senior fellow in the CEIP Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program; and Marc Pierini, visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe. https://carnegieeurope.eu/2020/11/30/taking-stock

10:30 a.m. — Middle East Institute Defense Leadership series webinar with U.K. Maj. Gen. Kevin Copsey, deputy commander of Operation Inherent Resolve. https://www.mei.edu/events/mei-defense-leadership-series

11:30 a.m. — National Defense Industrial Association virtual Interservice, Industry, Training, Simulation and Education Conference, with Deputy Defense Undersecretary for Acquisition and Sustainment Alan Shaffer; Nazzic Keene CEO of the Science Applications International Corporation; and Army Gen. John Murray, commanding general of the Army Futures Command. https://www.viitsec.org

4 p.m. — Woodrow Wilson Center History and Public Policy Program virtual book discussion on What Remains: Bringing America’s Missing Home from the Vietnam War, focusing on advances in forensic sciences, with author Sarah Wagner, associate professor of anthropology at George Washington University. https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event

TUESDAY | DECEMBER 1

All Day — NATO foreign ministers meet for two days via secure teleconference. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg will brief reporters both days online. https://www.nato.int

8 a.m. — Center for Strategic and International Studies webcast: “The Outlook for North Korea’s Economy Post-Pandemic,” with former CIA Senior Analyst Sue Mi Terry, senior fellow at CSIS. https://www.csis.org/events/online-event

9 a.m. — Carnegie Endowment for International Peace virtual discussion: “U.S.-China Relations Under Biden: A Lookahead,” with Paul Haenle, chair at the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center and former director for China, Taiwan and Mongolia Affairs at the National Security Council; Xie Tao, political science professor and dean of the Beijing Foreign Studies University’s School of International Relations and Diplomacy; and Evan Feigenbaum, CEIP vice president for studies. https://carnegieendowment.org

9 a.m. — United States Institute of Peace virtual discussion: “Contested Waters: Flashpoints for Conflict in Asia,” with David Michel, senior research fellow at the Center for Climate and Security; Abdul Aijaz, doctoral candidate at Indiana University Bloomington; Amit Ranjan, research fellow at the National University of Singapore Institute of South Asian Studies; Z Nang Raw, policy and strategy director at the Nyein Foundation; Jumaina Siddiqui, USIP senior program officer for South Asia; and Tegan Blaine, USIP senior adviser on environment and conflict. https://www.usip.org/events

12 p.m. — Aspen Cyber Summit will take place virtually over three days, Dec. 1-3., featuring daily keynote conversations as well as short talks and panel discussions. https://www.aspencybersummit.org

12:30 p.m. — Arms Control Association annual meeting with the theme “Arms Control, Nonproliferation and Disarmament into the Next Decade, with Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.; and U.N. Undersecretary for Disarmament Affairs Izumi Nakamitsu. https://www.armscontrol.org

1 p.m. — U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s 2nd Annual Space Summit with Air Force Secretary Barbara Bennett and Chief of Space Operations Gen. Jay Raymond. https://www.uschamber.com/event/space-summit-launch-global-growth

1:30 p.m. Pentagon Auditorium — Defense Department holds an assistant secretaries of defense town hall briefing. Livestream at https://www.dvidshub.net/webcast/25290

2 p.m. — Intelligence National Security Alliance virtual discussion: “Future of the National Security Cyber Workforce,” with former National Security Agency Deputy Director Chris Inglis, commissioner of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission; Air Force Brig. Gen. David Gaedecke, vice commander of Air Forces Cyber; Tonya Ugoretz, deputy assistant director for FBI Cyber Readiness, Outreach and Intelligence Branch; Teresa Shea, vice president of cyber offense and defense experts at Raytheon Intelligence and Space; and retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Jim Keffer, cyber director at Lockheed Martin Government Affairs. https://www.insaonline.org/event

3 p.m. — Atlantic Council webinar on a new report, “The Five Revolutions: Examining Defense Innovation in the Indo-Pacific Region,” with former Joint Chiefs Vice Chairman Gen. James Cartwright, board director of the Atlantic Council; Alan Pellegrini, CEO of Thales North America; Jon Grevatt, associate director of Janes; Rukmani Gupta, senior military capabilities analyst at Janes; and Tate Nurkin, nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council. https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event

4 p.m. — Air Force Association “Airmen in the Fight,” webinar with Lt. Gen. Kevin Schneider, commander of U.S. Forces Japan and Fifth Air Force, as part of the Airmen in the Fight series. https://www.afa.org/events/airmen-in-the-fight

WEDNESDAY | DECEMBER 2

8 a.m. — Atlantic Council virtual forum with current and former U.S. and South Korean officials on “issues facing the bilateral security alliance and economic partnership,” with Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Korea and Japan Marc Knapper. https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event

9:15 a.m. G50, Dirksen — Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Readiness and Management Support hearing on Navy and Marine Corps readiness, with Navy Secretary Kenneth Braithwaite, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Michael Gilday, and Marine Corps Commandant Gen. David Berger. https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/hearings

10:30 a.m. — George Washington University Project for Media and National Security Defense Writers Group conversation with Adm. Craig Faller, commander, U.S. Southern Command. https://nationalsecuritymedia.gwu.edu

11 a.m. — Brookings Institution webcast: “A conversation with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley.” https://www.brookings.edu/events

12 p.m. — Association of the U.S. Army “Noon Report” webinar on Army National Guard operations, with Command Sgt. Maj. John Sampa, the senior enlisted leader of the Army National Guard. https://info.ausa.org

THURSDAY | DECEMBER 3

12 p.m. — Hudson Institute virtual discussion: “Competing with Great Powers at the ‘Speed of Relevance,” with Ellen Lord, defense undersecretary for acquisition and sustainment. https://www.hudson.org/events

12 p.m. — R Street Institute and National Taxpayers Union webinar “Pentagon Purse Strings Episode 1: What is a Contingency? Exploring the OCO Account and Reform in the 117th Congress,” with Rep. Ralph Norman, R-S.C.; Andrew Lautz, National Taxpayers Union, Jonathan Bydlak, R Street Institute; and Wendy Jordan, senior policy analyst, Taxpayers for Common Sense. https://www.rstreet.org/event

1 p.m. Rayburn 2118 & Cisco Webex — House Armed Services Subcommittee on Readiness hearing: “Review of the Findings and Recommendations of the National Commission on Military Aviation Safety,” with retired Army Gen. Richard Cody, chairman, National Commission on Military Aviation Safety; and Richard Healing, vice chairman, National Commission on Military Aviation Safety. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

2 p.m. — Brookings Institution webcast: “The Future of U.S. Alliances in the Indo-Pacific,” with Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill. https://www.brookings.edu/events

5 p.m. — National Security Institute at George Mason University “NatSec Nightcap” conversation: “Advancing Diplomacy Aboard, a Deep Dive into U.S. Foreign Policy,” with Elliott Abrams, special representative for Iran and Venezuela; and Jamil Jaffer, founder and executive director, National Security Institute. https://nationalsecurity.gmu.edu/natsec-nightcap

FRIDAY | DECEMBER 4

9 a.m. — Center for Strategic and International Studies webcast with former CIA Director John Brennan on the top national security priorities for a new Biden administration. https://www.csis.org/events/online

1:30 p.m. — Center for Strategic and International Studies webcast: “Reflecting America’s Diversity in its Military,” with Army Maj. Gen. Tammy Smith; retired Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Charles Bolden, former NASA administrator; and Alice Hunt Friend, senior fellow in the CSIS International Security Program. https://www.csis.org/events

3 p.m. — Woodrow Wilson Center Kissinger Institute on China and the United States virtual book discussion on “Where Great Powers Meet,” focusing on the rivalry between the United States and China in Southeast Asia, with author David Shambaugh, director of the George Washington University China Policy Program; Robert Daly, director of the Kissinger Institute; and J. Stapleton Roy, director emeritus of the Kissinger Institute. https://www.wilsoncenter.org/event

3 p.m. — Hudson Institute webinar: “Diplomacy, Deterrence, and Disruption: Navigating North Korea Policy in 2021,” with Jihwan Hwang, associate professor at the University of Seoul; Andrea Mihailescu, fellow in residence at Pepperdine University; Won Gon Park, professor of international studies at Handong Global University; Brad Roberts, director of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Center for Global Security Research; and Patrick Cronin, senior fellow at Hudson. https://www.hudson.org/events

QUOTE OF THE DAY

Chris Krebs, fired director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, on CBS’s 60 Minutes.


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FBI Reports 2020 Rise in Violence

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Murder and assault rates rose nationwide in the first half of 2020, although other violent and property crime rates are on the decline, according to the FBI’s most recent Preliminary Uniform Crime Report (UCR).

Legal experts, meanwhile, warn about an increase in hate crimes, which were already spiking in 2019, the FBI said in a second report, released in November.

The FBI reported that cases of murder and non-negligent manslaughter rose 14.8% in 2020, and aggravated assaults were up 4.6%, while rapes were down 17.8% and robbery, 7.1%. Released in September, the UCR compares data for January to June 2020 to the same period in 2019. 

Rates of homicide and assault are indeed rising across the country, according to data from the National Commission on Covid-19 and Criminal Justice, created in July by the Council on Criminal Justice.

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The commission reports that homicide rates between June and August 2020 increased by 53% over the same period in 2019, while aggravated assaults went up by 14%.  Led by Richard Rosenfeld, PhD, a former president of the American Society of Criminology, the study concluded that “subduing the pandemic, pursuing crime control strategies of proven effectiveness, and enacting needed police reforms will be necessary to achieve durable reductions in violent crime in American cities.”

Hate crimes increased in 2019

Meanwhile, the FBI released its 2019 Hate Crime Statistics report two weeks ago. A survey of more than 15,000 law enforcement agencies across the country reported 7,314 criminal incidents and 8,559 related offenses that were motivated by race, ethnicity, ancestry, religion, sexual orientation and gender identity last year. 

More than half of the victims (57.6%) were targeted because of their race or ethnicity, and 20.15 because of religion. Another 16.7% were targeted because of sexual-orientation and 2.7% because of gender identity, said the report.

“Just in general, pandemic-induced weirdness may have set normal patterns aside, said Nora V. Demleitner, a professor of law at Washington and Lee University in Virginia, who sits on the board of the non-profit Prison Policy Initiative.

Ms. Demleitner suggested the rise in hate crimes is related to the political climate. “[There is] more widespread lack of trust in the police or a withdrawal of policing,” which may be due to staffing shortages in some communities due to Covid-19, she said.  

Stress of the pandemic

Legal experts attribute the increase in violent and hate crime to the stresses of the epidemic, especially unemployment and risk of exposure.

“Unemployment, economic insecurity and the stress of exposure to COVID-19, coupled with mandatory stay-at-home orders during the initial phases of the pandemic, have strained familial and community relationships,” said Daphne R. Robinson, an attorney and public health consultant in Shreveport, La.

“I believe that this upheaval has contributed to increased domestic violence, child abuse and participation in unlawful activities, thus increasing exposure to gun violence,” Ms. Robinson told Medical Daily. She maintained that the level of racist rhetoric has been increasing in the US, and people of color have increasingly felt marginalized.

Many people have been laid off or furloughed, and are isolated at home 24/7 with their families, or by themselves.

“Rather than the usual few hours between work and bed, the result is an increase in domestic violence,” said Don Hammond, a criminal defense attorney in Los Angeles. “That is reflected in the overall violent crime rate.” 

Common outlets for stress relief like gyms, bars and other activities have been severely curtailed due to COVID-19. Mr. Hammond said stress and energy build to a breaking point.

“That opportunity came when police officers killed several people, sparking large-scale protests,” Mr. Hammond said, referring to widespread protests that occurred after George Floyd was killed by a police officer in Minnesota last May.

Individuals either take out that stress on others or turn it against themselves. An article in April 2020 in the Journal of the American Medical Association warned of the heightened risk of suicide due to pandemic-related factors, including economic stress, isolation, less access to community and religious support, barriers to mental health treatment, and 24/7 news coverage. 

Courts at fault?

Another factor, suggested Mr. Hammond, is the courts’ handling of criminal cases during the pandemic. 

“Courts have closed, extended hearing dates, and reduced or eliminated bail. Jails also emptied out in an effort to prevent the spread of the virus,” he said.

“… Now, to deal with a backlog of trials (over 7,000 in LA County), prosecutors are offering better plea deals to resolve cases, resulting in less custody time for those who are convicted.” 

This has set some criminals free and able to commit additional crimes, believing they would not be held in custody due to COVID-19, he said.

Unfortunately, the criminal justice system as a whole does a poor job of providing resources to address issues that underlie criminal conduct—mental health, addictions, poverty and other conditions that lead to crime, said Mr. Hammond.

“To the extent that this has been improving over the last several years, 2020 has been a step backwards, as courts get overwhelmed with cases and are reluctant to monitor more people in programs.” 

Jennifer Nelson is a health writer based in Florida who also writes about health and wellness for AARP, PBS’ Next Avenue, Shondaland, and others.


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Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince nominated for 2021 Nobel Peace Prize

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Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan   |  Photo Credit: AP

Tel Aviv: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan have been nominated for the next year’s Nobel Peace Prize for their roles in establishing diplomatic ties between their countries, said the Israeli premier’s office on Tuesday.

“Nobel Peace Prize laureate Lord David Trimble today submitted the candidacy of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for the Nobel Peace Prize, together with Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed,” the Prime Minister’s office said in a statement, as quoted by Sputnik.

According to Sputnik, Trimble, the former first minister of Northern Ireland, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998 for his efforts to find a peaceful solution to the conflict in northern Ireland. Since Trimble himself is the Nobel Peace Prize laureate, it gives him the privilege of nominating others.

The Nobel Prize Committee will review Natanyahu’s and Al Nahyan’s candidacies.

On September 15, United States President Donald Trump presided over a signing ceremony at the White House to establish the foundation of the peace agreements among Israel, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates.

According to the Abraham Accord signed by the two Gulf countries, Bahrain and the UAE, they have now joined Egypt and Jordan as the only Arab nations to have full relations with Israel.

After the signing of the Abraham Accord by Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu, Bahrain’s foreign minister Abdullatif bin Rashid Al Zayani and Crown Prince Nahyan, Trump called on other Arab and Muslim nations to follow the UAE’s lead.

Along with the two heads of state, it was announced in September that US President Trump has been nominated for the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize following his efforts to broker peace between Israel and the UAE.

The nomination was submitted by Christian Tybring-Gjedde, a member of the Norwegian Parliament, citing his “key role in… creating new dynamics in other protracted conflicts, such as the Kashmir border dispute between India and Pakistan”. (


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Germany’s confirmed coronavirus cases rise by 11,169: RKI

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BERLIN (Reuters) – The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Germany increased by 11,169 to 1,053,869, data from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases showed on Monday. The reported death toll rose by 125 to 16,248, the tally showed.

Reporting by Berlin Newsroom; Editing by Christian Schmollinger


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Opinion | 1918 Germany Has a Warning for America

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The startling aspect about the Dolchstosslegende is this: It did not grow weaker after 1918 but stronger. In the face of humiliation and unable or unwilling to cope with the truth, many Germans embarked on a disastrous self-delusion: The nation had been betrayed, but its honor and greatness could never be lost. And those without a sense of national duty and righteousness — the left and even the elected government of the new republic — could never be legitimate custodians of the country.

In this way, the myth was not just the sharp wedge that drove the Weimar Republic apart. It was also at the heart of Nazi propaganda, and instrumental in justifying violence against opponents. The key to Hitler’s success was that, by 1933, a considerable part of the German electorate had put the ideas embodied in the myth — honor, greatness, national pride — above democracy.

The Germans were so worn down by the lost war, unemployment and international humiliation that they fell prey to the promises of a “Führer” who cracked down hard on anyone perceived as “traitors,” leftists and Jews above all. The stab-in-the-back myth was central to it all. When Hitler became chancellor on Jan. 30, 1933, the Nazi newspaper Völkischer Beobachter wrote that “irrepressible pride goes through the millions” who fought so long to “undo the shame of 9 November 1918.”

Germany’s first democracy fell. Without a basic consensus built on a shared reality, society split into groups of ardent, uncompromising partisans. And in an atmosphere of mistrust and paranoia, the notion that dissenters were threats to the nation steadily took hold.

Alarmingly, that seems to be exactly what is happening in the United States today. According to the Pew Research Center, 89 percent of Trump supporters believe that a Joe Biden presidency would do “lasting harm to the U.S.,” while 90 percent of Biden supporters think the reverse. And while the question of which news media to trust has long split America, now even the largely unmoderated Twitter is regarded as partisan. Since the election, millions of Trump supporters have installed the alternative social media app Parler. Filter bubbles are turning into filter networks.

In such a landscape of social fragmentation, Mr. Trump’s baseless accusations about electoral fraud could do serious harm. A staggering 88 percent of Trump voters believe that the election result is illegitimate, according to a YouGov poll. A myth of betrayal and injustice is well underway.

It took another war and decades of reappraisal for the Dolchstosslegende to be exposed as a disastrous, fatal fallacy. If it has any worth today, it is in the lessons it can teach other nations. First among them: Beware the beginnings.

Jochen Bittner (@JochenBittner) is a co-head of the debate section for the weekly newspaper Die Zeit and a contributing opinion writer.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.

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Rethinking lone-wolf extremism – Samuel Bezzina

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France is getting to grips once again with its domestic jihadist threat, after two lone-wolf attacks in Nice and Paris.

On October 29, three churchgoers in Nice were hacked to death by a Tunisian migrant at the city’s Notre Dame cathedral. This was preceded by the gruesome beheading of Samuel Paty, a history schoolteacher, at the hands of a Chechen-born expat near Paris on October 16.

The triggering factor that inspired such violence was France’s upholding of liberal patriotic values, defending Paty’s cartoon showing of Prophet Muhammad during his free speech classes.

Both tragedies show how Western counterterrorism continues to struggle in understanding lone-wolf extremism as an undetectable, unpredictable and persistent terrorist threat.

Two days before Paty’s assassination, Britain’s MI5 chief, Ken McCallum, admitted that “more terrorists have gone for basic attack methods requiring little preparation, meaning fewer clues to detect in advance.”

Like terrorism, lone-wolf extremism is hard to define. Generalisations have neither been recognised by policymakers nor academics in terms of obscure interactions, ideological beliefs and choice of tactics and targets adopted by militants. Political violence staged by individuals can be traced back to the early 1800s, when anarchist activists committed random attacks in Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and the US.

Australian sociologist Ramon Spaaij recognises that “lone-wolf terrorists operate individually, do not belong to an organised group and whose methods are directed by individuals without outside command”.

Single-minded determination, strategic direction and independence to plot violence have made solo acts of terrorism high-profile, devastating and unforgettable for victims and audiences. Patrizio Peci, a former Red Brigades militant, once described how these characteristics require individual terrorists to become “tense but not nervous, calm but not relaxed, decisive but not foolhardy”.   

Virtual self-radicalisation, irrespective of ideological influences, have inspired lone attackers to follow radical social media platforms, publicise their militant content and call for extreme solutions through violence.

Guns need hands but they also need ideas

Norway’s 2011 attacks are an example. Anders Breivik’s murder of 77 civilians, from the Oslo bomb to the Utøya shootings, reflected his online presence to promote his far-right ideology.

Convinced that Islam and migration were threatening Norway’s white power identity, Breivik’s belief to use terrorism was shaped by Nordic xenophobic blogs that praised violence as a moral (if not spiritual) defence against ‘betraying’ governments undertaking multiculturalism.

Breivik’s bloodstained beliefs, posted online under his manifesto ‘2083: A European declaration of independence’, would serve to inspire online activists to carry out greater lethal attacks, including Brandon Tarrant’s 2019 anti-Muslim massacres in Christchurch, New Zealand.

For Western liberal democracy, Islamist terrorism remains a disturbing phenomenon when rethinking lone-wolf extremism. On November 2, Vienna saw Austrian-born IS supporter Kujtim Fejzulai mow down four bystanders in a gun-and-knifing spree. Fejzulai had been prevented from joining ISIS in Syria by Austria’s security services and was later released from prison.

Later revelations from Austria’s interior ministry indicated that Fejzulai’s wish for revenge was incensed by his attendance at two local mosques preaching political Islam. Revenge plays an emotional role that persuades lone-wolf extremists to adopt political violence.

Lone attackers imagine the use of terrorism as altruistic, seeking to defend powerless communities by violently cleansing the evils of liberal democracy. Irish terrorism expert Louise Richardson argues: “I grapple with how a young idealist can believe that, in murdering innocent people, he is battling injustice and fighting for a fairer world.”

Europe’s recent jihadist attacks show how terrorism’s ideological threat continues to stimulate future lone-wolf militants, adopting a radical mindset that reshapes contextual problems, reidentify in-group victims and out-group targets and justify violence in ethical terms to achieve goals in whose cause they fight for.

Sotiris Kondylis, an ex-terrorist from Greece’s defunct Marxist gang 17 November, once concluded: “Guns need hands but they also need ideas. If the ideas are not there, the guns won’t work.”

Samuel Bezzina, independent researcher in terrorism and political violence

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Iran says Israel remotely killed military nuclear scientist

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TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — A top Iranian security official on Monday accused Israel of using “electronic devices” to remotely kill a scientist who founded the Islamic Republic’s military nuclear program in the 2000s.

Ali Shamkhani, the secretary of the country’s Supreme National Security Council, made the comment at the funeral for Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, where Iran’s defense minister separately vowed to continue the man’s work “with more speed and more power.”

Israel, long suspected of killing Iranian nuclear scientists over the last decade, has repeatedly declined to comment on the attack.

Fakhrizadeh headed Iran’s so-called AMAD program, which Israel and the West have alleged was a military operation looking at the feasibility of building a nuclear weapon. The International Atomic Energy Agency says that “structured program” ended in 2003. U.S. intelligence agencies concurred with that assessment in a 2007 report.

Israel insists Iran still maintains the ambition of developing nuclear weapons, pointing to Tehran’s ballistic missile program and research into other technologies. Iran long has maintained that its nuclear program is peaceful.

Shamkhani’s remarks drastically change the story of Fakhrizadeh’s killing, which took place on Friday. Authorities initially said a truck exploded and then gunmen opened fire on the scientist, killing him and a bodyguard. State TV even interviewed a man the night of the attack who described seeing gunmen open fire.

State TV’s English-language broadcaster Press TV reported earlier Monday that a weapon recovered from the scene of the attack bore “the logo and specifications of the Israeli military industry.” State TV’s Arabic-language channel, Al-Alam, claimed the weapons used were “controlled by satellite,” a claim also made Sunday by the semiofficial Fars news agency.

None of the outlets immediately offered evidence supporting their claims, which also give authorities a way to explain why no one was reportedly arrested at the scene.

“Unfortunately, the operation was a very complicated operation and was carried out by using electronic devices,” Shamkhani told state TV. “No individual was present at the site.”

Satellite control of weapons is nothing new. Armed, long-range drones, for instance, rely on satellite connections to be controlled by their remote pilots. Remote-controlled gun turrets also exist, but typically see their operator connected by a hard line to cut down on the delay in commands being relayed. Israel uses such hard-wired systems along the border with the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip.

While technically feasible, it wasn’t immediately clear if such a system had been used before, said Jeremy Binnie, the Mideast editor of Jane’s Defence Weekly.

“Could you set up a weapon with a camera which then has a feed that uses an open satellite communications line back to the controller?” Binnie said. “I can’t see why that’s not possible.”

It also raised the question whether the truck that exploded during the attack detonated afterward to try and destroy a satellite-controlled machine gun that was hidden inside the vehicle. Iranian officials did not immediately acknowledge that. It also would require someone on the ground to set up the weapon.

Shamkhani also blamed the Iranian exile group Mujahedeen-e-Khalq as well for “having a role in this,” without elaborating. The MEK, as the exile group is known, has been suspected of assisting Israeli operations in Iran in the past. The group did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Monday’s service for Fakhrizadeh took place at an outdoor portion of Iran’s Defense Ministry in Tehran, with officials including Revolutionary Guard chief Gen. Hossein Salami, the Guard’s Quds Force leader Gen. Esmail Ghaani, civilian nuclear program chief Ali Akbar Sahei and Intelligence Minister Mamoud Alavi. They sat apart from each other and wore masks due to the coronavirus pandemic as reciters melodically read portions of the Quran and religious texts.

Defense Minister Gen. Amir Hatami gave a speech after kissing Fakhrizadeh’s casket and putting his forehead against it. He said Fakhrizadeh’s killing would make Iranians “more united, more determined.”

“For the continuation of your path, we will continue with more speed and more power,” Hatami said in comments aired live by state television.

Hatami also criticized countries that hadn’t condemned Fakhrizadeh’s killing and warned: “This will catch up with you someday.”

Overnight, the United Arab Emirates, which just reached a normalization deal with Israel, issued a statement condemning “the heinous assassination.” The UAE, home to Abu Dhabi and Dubai, warned the killing “could further fuel conflict in the region.”

Last year, the UAE found itself in the middle of an escalating series of incidents between Iran and the U.S. Though long suspicious of Iran’s nuclear program, the Emirates has said it wants to de-escalate the crisis. The UAE just started passenger air service to Israel and Israelis are expected to vacation in the country over Hanukkah in the coming days.

Meanwhile, Israeli Foreign Ministry Director-General Alon Ushpiz has sent a cable to all Israeli diplomatic delegations around the globe urging diplomats to maintain “the highest level of readiness and awareness of any irregular activity” around missions and Jewish community centers.

Hebrew-language media in Israel reported that following the Fakhrizadeh’s killing, the Foreign Ministry ordered security beefed up at certain Israeli diplomatic missions overseas. The ministry declined to comment on diplomatic security matters.

___

Gambrell reported from Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Associated Press writer Ilan Ben Zion in Jerusalem contributed to this report.


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