Brooklyn banks and financial services - Advertisement from The News And Times - TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com

Advertisements – Advertising at The News And Times – advertising-newsandtimes.com | WE CONNECT!

Audio | Video | Top News | On Twitter | Security | FBI | Capitol Riot | JOSSICA | Trump | Russia | Putin | Russia – Ukraine War | Covid-19 | Brooklyn NY | Puerto Rico | World 

The Brooklyn Guide

September 26, 2022 6:35 am

The News And Times | Featured Posts | All Articles | Current News | Selected Articles | Shared Links | Opinions | In My Opinion | Sites | Blogs | Links | Twitter | Facebook

Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

Little optimism in Russia-Ukraine peace talks – World – Al-Ahram Weekly

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

In a frosty atmosphere and with no handshakes, Russian and Ukrainian negotiators began peace talks under the auspices of Turkey this week in the first face-to-face talks in two weeks between the two sides, raising hopes that there could be progress towards ending a conflict that has turned into a war of attrition in Ukraine.

The international powers are hoping for a ceasefire and a political settlement of the conflict that threatens the world with dire consequences if it escalates out of control and expands to neighbouring countries. However, the dynamics on the ground are not encouraging of the chances of success.

The talks started in a surreal atmosphere when the Kremlin was forced to dismiss reports that Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich suffered symptoms consistent with poisoning during an informal round of talks earlier this month, calling the reports “part of the information war” on the war in Ukraine.

The Ukrainian negotiators are seeking a ceasefire without compromising the sovereignty or territorial integrity of Ukraine, while the Russian negotiators want to ensure Ukraine’s neutrality, its non-joining of NATO, the recognition of the legality of its annexation of Crimea, and the protection of Russian minorities in eastern and southern Ukraine.

Both sides have played down hopes of an early breakthrough.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the sponsor of the talks, told the two sides that they had a “historic responsibility” to halt the fighting in Ukraine.

The Ukrainian negotiators have shared details of what has been covered at the talks in Istanbul, stating that Ukraine has proposed adopting a neutral status in exchange for security guarantees, meaning it would not join military alliances or host military bases.

The proposals would also include a 15-year consultation period on the status of annexed Crimea and could come into force only in the event of a complete ceasefire.

Ukrainian negotiator Oleksander Chaly said in comments broadcast on Ukrainian television that “if we manage to consolidate these key provisions, and for us this is the most fundamental, then Ukraine will be in a position to actually fix its current status as a non-bloc and non-nuclear state in the form of permanent neutrality.

“We will not host foreign military bases on our territory, or deploy military contingents on our territory, and we will not enter into military-political alliances. Military exercises on our territory will take place with the consent of the guarantor countries.”

He said there was enough material in the current Ukrainian proposals to warrant a meeting between Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Mykhailo Podolyak, an adviser to Ukraine’s president and lead negotiator in the talks with Russia, said that a “security guarantees” treaty with an “enhanced analogue” of NATO’s “Article 5” collective defence clause was discussed during the talks, adding that the guarantor states of the US, the UK, Turkey, France, Germany would be legally involved in protecting Ukraine from any aggression. There would be implementation through a referendum and the parliaments of the guarantor states.

There was no immediate Russian response to the Ukrainian proposals.

Meanwhile, European diplomats hope that the negotiations could be a path towards stopping further military and political escalation. French President Emmanuel Macron continued his efforts in this regard in a telephone call with Putin on Tuesday. 

At the weekend, Macron warned against the use of inflammatory remarks after US President Joe Biden said Putin “cannot remain in power”, words he stood by in a press conference at the White House on Monday by saying “I make no apologies.”

Biden said he was not calling for regime change in Russia but expressing personal “moral outrage” over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, defending the unscripted remarks he made at the end of a speech in Poland at the weekend.

Senior figures in the US administration immediately attempted to play down the comments.

Even at the height of the Cold War, there was red line stopping US presidents from calling for regime change in Moscow, whatever the two countries’ differences. The fact that this red line has been crossed by Biden is a source of European concern.

The Europeans are also anxious because on his tour in Poland Biden spoke very little about peace and talked instead about a “long fight” in Europe. “We need to be clear-eyed: this battle will not be won in days, or months, either. We need to steel ourselves for the long fight ahead,” Biden said.

Zelensky has not hidden his misgivings that Moscow could use the negotiations to re-mobilise its military forces and continue its advances to seize areas of eastern and southern Ukraine. He wants the West to strengthen its sanctions against Moscow and to provide his country with planes, tanks, and other military aid.

Hours before the start of the talks in Istanbul, Zelensky said that his country was prepared to declare its neutrality and was open to compromise over the contested eastern region of Donbas, in essence suggesting a reversion to the 2015 Minsk 2 Settlement.

But he also warned that if the “ruthless war” continued, the Ukrainian people would continue to pay for the “weak” Western sanctions with their lives, criticising what he described as the “passive” sanctions imposed by the West on Russia.

“Ukraine cannot and will not agree with the passive sanctions position of some entities towards Russia. There should be no ‘suspended’ sanctions packages — that if the Russian troops do something, then there will be some answer,” he said.

“If the sanctions packages are weak or do not work enough, and if they can be circumvented, it creates a dangerous illusion for the Russian leadership that they can continue to afford what they are doing now. And the Ukrainians pay for it with their lives. Thousands of lives,” he said.

Urging other countries to act with courage, Zelensky said that “Ukrainians should not die just because someone cannot find enough courage to hand over the necessary weapons to Ukraine. Fear always makes you an accomplice.”

“If someone is afraid of Russia, if he or she is afraid to make the necessary decisions that are important to us, in particular for us to get planes, tanks, necessary artillery, and shells, it makes these people responsible for the catastrophe created by Russian troops in our cities,” he said.

However, putting more pressure on Russia could hinder the Istanbul negotiations and make a difficult situation even more difficult. Kremlin Spokesperson Dmitry Peskov made Moscow’s view clear on Tuesday, arguing that the Western sanctions on trade with Russia were akin to “total war” and that the West had pushed the Kremlin “into the corner” with its NATO expansion.

In an interview on the US TV channel PBS, Peskov said that the punitive sanctions levelled against Russia were “quite unfriendly” and made the country feel as if it were at war with the US and its Western allies.

“We entered the phase, the phase of a total war… And we have to adapt ourselves to a new reality. You have to understand Russia,” he said.

Russia’s Defence Ministry said Russia will “drastically reduce” military activity outside the cities of Kyiv and Chernihiv, and Russian Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu said on Tuesday that “the main tasks of the first stage of the operation have been completed. The combat potential of the Ukrainian armed forces has been significantly reduced, which makes it possible to focus our main attention and main efforts on achieving the main goal — the liberation of Donbas.”

His statement was a sign that Moscow may focus on the strategic Donbas region of Ukraine to ensure the division of the country into east and west, a scenario described as “the Korean model” after Korea’s division of two states in the wake of World War II.

As a result, while the Russians and the Ukrainians may be talking about peace, each side is moving on the ground to tighten the noose around the other.

Because of the complexities of the historical relations between the two countries, the lack of trust, and the divergence of their demands, the expectations are that a new cold war between Russia and the West is inevitable. Regardless of the outcome of the talks, relations with Moscow will enter a phase of strategic hostility that will lead to a significant increase in military spending for the NATO countries and Russia.

This militarisation of Western-Russian relations will have disastrous results in addressing serious problems, foremost among them the challenges of climate change and global warming, the fight against poverty, and stopping conflicts in other regions of the world.

In this depressing scenario, Roman Catholic Pope Francis levelled strong criticism this week against the NATO countries for increasing their defence spending, describing it as “madness”.

He said the conflict in Ukraine was a product of “the old logic of power that still dominates so-called geopolitics.”

“It is now clear that good politics cannot come from the culture of power understood as domination and oppression, but only from a culture of care, care for the person and their dignity, and care for our common home. The real answer is not more weapons, more sanctions, and more political-military alliances,” he added.

What is needed is “a different way of governing the globalised world, not by showing your teeth, as is done now, but a different way to frame international relations. I was embarrassed when I read that a group of states has committed to spending two per cent… of GDP on acquiring weapons as a response to what is happening now. Madness,” Francis said.

*A version of this article appears in print in the 31 March, 2022 edition of Al-Ahram Weekly

Short link:


Spread the news
Categories
Featured - Sticky Posts The News And Times Blog

The News And Times Review | Blogs

Spread the news

 3:27 PM 3/30/2022

News Reviews – The News And Times

Current News

Current News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Current News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
All Articles – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – All Articles from InoReader
Selected Articles – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Michael Novakhov’s favorite articles on Inoreader
Blogs – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Blogs from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Opinions – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Opinions from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
AP – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – AP from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Breaking News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Breaking News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
News Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – News Review from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
NYTimes – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – NYTimes from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
President Biden on Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – President Biden on Twitter from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Top News and Stories – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Top News and Stories from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Shared Links and Social Media

Home / Twitter
Shared Links – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Shared Links from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
On Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – On Twitter
Tweets – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Tweets from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Audio

Audio – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Audio Review

Live Radio

Live Radio – The Brookyn Times

Video

YouTube
Video Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – YouTube subscriptions from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Video News – 2022 – YouTube Playlist – The News And Times Review
RSS – Video News – 2022 from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Security

Security – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Security from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Accidents and Incidents – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
Accidents and Incidents from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Capitol Riot – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Capitol Riot of 1.6.21 from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
FBI – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – FBI from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
FBI and Trump – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – FBI and Trump from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Police News Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
Police News Review from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Assassination of Jovenel Moise in Haiti – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Assassination of Jovenel Moise in Haiti from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Champlain Collapse – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Champlain Collapse from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Cybersecurity, Cyberattacks and Ransomware – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Cybersecurity, Cyberattacks and Ransomware from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Counterintelligence News Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Counterintelligence News Review from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Intelligence – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Intelligence from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
JOSSICA – OSINT: Open Source Intel News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – JOSSICA from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Journalistic Investigations – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Journalistic Investigations from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Operation Novichok – Salisbury Poisoning – The Skripal Saga
RSS – Operation Novichok – Salisbury Poisoning – The Skripal Saga from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Trump – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Trump from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Russia and Ukraine

Biden and Putin – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
Biden and Putin – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Biden and Putin from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Putin and Putinism – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Putin and Putinism from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia – Ukraine war – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia – Ukraine war from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia Video News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia Video News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia – Ukraine War On Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia – Ukraine War On Twitter from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia, Ukraine, Nato – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia, Ukraine, Nato from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Президент России on Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Президент России on Twitter from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Covid-19

CoronaVirus – Omicron – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – CoronaVirus – Omicron from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Coronavirus News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Coronavirus News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Coronavirus Origins – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Coronavirus Origins from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Covid Delta Variant – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Covid Delta Variant from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Disease X-19 Symptoms – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Disease X-19 Symptoms from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Brooklyn and New York

Brooklyn News Review – The Brooklyn Times – BklynTimes.com
RSS – Brooklyn News Review from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Brooklyn and NY Video News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Brooklyn and NY Video News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Brooklyn on Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Brooklyn on Twitter from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Brooklyn Weather – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Brooklyn Weather from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russian New York – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russian New York from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Tweets from NYS Governor – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Tweets from NYS Governor from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Puerto Rico News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Puerto Rico News Videos – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Puerto Rico News Videos from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

World

Israel and Middle East – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Israel and Middle East from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Afghanistan – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Afghanistan from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Germany – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Germany from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Kazakhstan – Казахстан – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Kazakhstan – Казахстан from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Sites

Sites – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Sites from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
News Channels – News Channels
My News Links – mynewslinks.com | My News Links – mynewslinks.com | Audio Posts in English

Lifestyles

Gay Links – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Gay Links from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader


Spread the news
Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

News Reviews – The News And Times – 3:27 PM 3/30/2022

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from The News And Times.

 3:27 PM 3/30/2022

News Reviews – The News And Times

Current News

Current News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Current News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
All Articles – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – All Articles from InoReader
Selected Articles – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Michael Novakhov’s favorite articles on Inoreader
Blogs – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Blogs from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Opinions – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Opinions from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
AP – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – AP from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Breaking News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Breaking News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
News Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – News Review from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
NYTimes – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – NYTimes from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
President Biden on Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – President Biden on Twitter from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Top News and Stories – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Top News and Stories from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Shared Links and Social Media

Home / Twitter
Shared Links – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Shared Links from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
On Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – On Twitter
Tweets – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Tweets from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Audio

Audio – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Audio Review

Live Radio

Live Radio – The Brookyn Times

Video

YouTube
Video Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – YouTube subscriptions from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Video News – 2022 – YouTube Playlist – The News And Times Review
RSS – Video News – 2022 from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Security

Security – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Security from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Accidents and Incidents – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
Accidents and Incidents from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Capitol Riot – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Capitol Riot of 1.6.21 from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
FBI – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – FBI from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
FBI and Trump – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – FBI and Trump from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Police News Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
Police News Review from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Assassination of Jovenel Moise in Haiti – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Assassination of Jovenel Moise in Haiti from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Champlain Collapse – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Champlain Collapse from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Cybersecurity, Cyberattacks and Ransomware – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Cybersecurity, Cyberattacks and Ransomware from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Counterintelligence News Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Counterintelligence News Review from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Intelligence – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Intelligence from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
JOSSICA – OSINT: Open Source Intel News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – JOSSICA from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Journalistic Investigations – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Journalistic Investigations from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Operation Novichok – Salisbury Poisoning – The Skripal Saga
RSS – Operation Novichok – Salisbury Poisoning – The Skripal Saga from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Trump – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Trump from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Russia and Ukraine

Biden and Putin – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
Biden and Putin – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Biden and Putin from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Putin and Putinism – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Putin and Putinism from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia – Ukraine war – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia – Ukraine war from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia Video News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia Video News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia – Ukraine War On Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia – Ukraine War On Twitter from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia, Ukraine, Nato – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia, Ukraine, Nato from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Президент России on Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Президент России on Twitter from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Covid-19

CoronaVirus – Omicron – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – CoronaVirus – Omicron from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Coronavirus News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Coronavirus News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Coronavirus Origins – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Coronavirus Origins from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Covid Delta Variant – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Covid Delta Variant from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Disease X-19 Symptoms – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Disease X-19 Symptoms from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Brooklyn and New York

Brooklyn News Review – The Brooklyn Times – BklynTimes.com
RSS – Brooklyn News Review from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Brooklyn and NY Video News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Brooklyn and NY Video News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Brooklyn on Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Brooklyn on Twitter from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Brooklyn Weather – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Brooklyn Weather from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russian New York – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russian New York from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Tweets from NYS Governor – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Tweets from NYS Governor from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Puerto Rico News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Puerto Rico News Videos – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Puerto Rico News Videos from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

World

Israel and Middle East – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Israel and Middle East from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Afghanistan – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Afghanistan from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Germany – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Germany from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Kazakhstan – Казахстан – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Kazakhstan – Казахстан from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Sites

Sites – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Sites from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
News Channels – News Channels
My News Links – mynewslinks.com | My News Links – mynewslinks.com | Audio Posts in English

Lifestyles

Gay Links – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Gay Links from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Spread the news
Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

A space-based missile defense system would put future Putins in their place

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

Vladimir Putin believes that he can send his army into Ukraine to commit mass murder on a scale not seen since Hitler’s Germany because he is secure in the knowledge that the civilized world is limited in what it can do to stop him. If NATO were to send troops into Ukraine to save its people from the wrath of the Russian Army, Putin darkly hints that nuclear weapons would be unleashed. Just as during the Cold War, such an act would be the end of human civilization.

Isn’t it too bad that a way doesn’t exist to stop a nuclear exchange with “the means of rendering these nuclear weapons impotent and obsolete?” The question was first posed 40 years ago by President Ronald Reagan, when he proposed the Strategic Defense Initiative, as a way to break the balance of terror and lift the prospect of a global thermonuclear holocaust. Reagan and his advisers envisioned a multi-layered defense system, much of it space based, that would stop a nuclear attack by shooting down missiles before they reached their targets.

Reagan’s opponents jeered at the idea of a space-based missile defense system, calling it “Star Wars.” The ridicule was not shared inside the Kremlin, however. The Soviet leadership was still smarting from the last demonstration of American technological supremacy, the victory in the race to the moon. The Soviets bent every effort to counter SDI, from a massive disinformation campaign to technological responses.

Reagan’s dream of a world in which nuclear weapons were impotent and obsolete was not fulfilled. The technological problems in developing such a system were enormous in the 1980s. Domestic political opposition to SDI was even greater. In any case, the Soviet Union fell before a serious missile defense system could be deployed. The fear of a global, civilization-ending nuclear exchange receded.

Putin has brought back the nuclear terror. If the civilized world were to dare try to stop the rape of Ukraine beyond sending that country weapons and imposing economic sanctions, the fear is that he will decide that if he cannot win, no one can. Putin might do it anyway if he sees his beleaguered army about to break. The man who would set a match to cities in Ukraine may not shrink from threatening the great cities of Europe and North America.

Fortunately, technology has progressed tremendously since the time President Reagan dreamed of a world without the threat of nuclear annihilation. The United States military is developing a number of land-based, sea-based, and air-based laser weapons. Computer systems, once thought to be a limiting factor for managing a missile defense system, are now more than up to the task. Thanks primarily to the efforts of Elon Musk’s SpaceX, the cost of launching things into space has plummeted.

The U.S. even has a service branch for which space-based missile defense is well suited: the Space Force.

In order to restrain future Putins, whether they reside in Moscow, Beijing, Tehran or Pyongyang, the United States should revive the Reagan-era dream of a space-based missile defense system. As soon as it is practical, a series of battle stations, armed with laser weapons, should be deployed to cover enemy missile launchers, both land based and submarine based, ready to shoot down any missile in the boost phase, The system should be augmented with midcourse and terminal phase systems to provide a layered defense. Israel is already developing a ground-based laser ABM system called the Iron Beam.

If such a missile defense system existed in 2022, Putin would never have dared invade Ukraine. Indeed, Xi Jinping would never contemplate an attack on Taiwan. An effective missile defense would not only at long last end the threat of nuclear war but would be a means of keeping the peace from tyrants with territorial demands.

A space-based missile defense system would be expensive to build and maintain. But it would be less expensive than living in a world where tyrants like Putin feel free to threaten world peace and visit fire and the sword upon their neighbors. It would be based on another principle Reagan cherished: peace through strength.

Mark Whittington, who writes frequently about space and politics, has published a political study of space exploration entitled Why is It So Hard to Go Back to the Moon? as well as The Moon, Mars and Beyond, and, most recently, Why is America Going Back to the Moon? He blogs at Curmudgeons Corner.


Spread the news
Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

News Reviews – The News And Times

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from The News And Times.

Post Link – News Reviews – The News And Times

1:23 PM 3/29/2022

Current News

Current News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Current News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
All Articles – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – All Articles from InoReader
Selected Articles – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Michael Novakhov’s favorite articles on Inoreader
Tweets – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Tweets from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
On Twitter – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – On Twitter
Audio – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Audio Review
YouTube
Video Review – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – YouTube subscriptions from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Blogs – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Blogs from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Shared Links – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Shared Links from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Opinions – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Opinions from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Russia and Ukraine

Biden and Putin – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
Biden and Putin – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Biden and Putin from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Putin and Putinism – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Putin and Putinism from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia – Ukraine war – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia – Ukraine war from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Russia Video News – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Russia Video News from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Security

Security – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
RSS – Security from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader
Accidents and Incidents – The News And Times Review – TheNewsAndTimes.Blogspot.com
Accidents and Incidents from Michael Novakhov on Inoreader

Brooklyn and New York

Puerto Rico


Spread the news
Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

US intel assess ‘major’ strategy shift by Russia as it moves some forces away from Kyiv

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

The Russian forces now pulling back in some areas of the north will focus on gains in the south and east. The US is already observing these movements underway, including Russian Battalion Tactical Groups leaving the surrounding areas around Kyiv.

The Russian Ministry of Defense said Tuesday that it has decided to

“drastically reduce hostilities”

in the Kyiv and Chernigov directions, Russian Deputy Defense Minister Alexander Fomin said according to state media RIA.

The US assesses Russia will cover their retreat with air and artillery bombardment of the capital, one of the officials said. US officials caution that Russia could always reverse again if the battle conditions allow.

The move follows peace talks between Russian and Ukrainian delegations in Istanbul on Tuesday. It also comes as President Joe Biden holds a call with French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi and United Kingdom Prime Minister Boris Johnson to discuss the latest developments in Ukraine.

In the US view, this is not a short-term adjustment to regroup, but a longer-term move as Russia comes to grips with failure to advance in the north. The official said one consequence the US is concerned about is keeping the European allies unified on economic pressure and military support as Washington expects some of them to press Ukraine to accept a peace deal to end the fighting.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Tuesday cautioned that Russia saying it would be reducing hostilities around Kyiv could be “a means by which Russia once again is trying to deflect and deceive people into thinking it’s not doing what it is doing.”

“If they somehow believe that an effort to subjugate ‘only’ — in quotation marks — the eastern part of Ukraine and the southern part of Ukraine can succeed, then once again they are profoundly fooling themselves,” Blinken said at a joint press conference with Moroccan Foreign Minister Nasser Bourita.

Ukraine’s military intelligence head says Russian President Vladimir Putin could be looking to carve Ukraine in two, like North and South Korea.

Brig. Gen. Kyrylo Budanov, the head of Ukraine’s Defense Intelligence Agency, said Russia’s operations around Kyiv had failed and it was now impossible for the Russian army to overthrow the Ukrainian government. Putin’s war was now focused on the south and the east of the country, he said.

“There is reason to believe that he is considering a ‘Korean’ scenario for Ukraine. That is, [Russian forces] will try to impose a dividing line between the unoccupied and occupied regions of our country,” Budanov said. “In fact, it is an attempt to create North and South Korea in Ukraine.”

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said on Sunday that Ukraine is ready to accept a neutral status as part of a peace deal with Russia.

“Security guarantees and the neutral, non-nuclear status of our state. We are ready to accept this. This is the most important point,” Zelensky said.

“The issues of Donbas and Crimea must be discussed and solved” in peace talks, Zelensky also said.

CNN’s Michael Conte and Jeremy Herb contributed to this report.


Spread the news
Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

Grani.Ru: Russian-Ukrainian talks started in Istanbul

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from Грани.Ру // Статьи.

103975


Another round of Russian-Ukrainian talks has begun in Istanbul at the residence of the Turkish President Dolmabahce,
Anadolu
reports . They will last two days.


The talks began with an opening speech by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.


This is the first face-to-face meeting between representatives of the two countries since March 7.
In recent weeks, negotiations have been held via video link. Before that, face-to-face negotiations were held in Belarus on February 28, March 3 and March 7.


According
to the Financial Times, citing four sources familiar with the negotiations, Russia has abandoned some of its original demands on Ukraine – namely, “denafification”, demilitarization and legal guarantees for the protection of the Russian language. Moscow and Kyiv are said to be discussing a suspension of hostilities as part of an agreement that would see Ukraine withdraw from NATO in exchange for security guarantees and the prospect of joining the European Union. Ukraine must also refrain from developing nuclear weapons and hosting foreign military bases on its territory.


In return, Ukraine will receive security guarantees “close to Article 5 of NATO” from 11 countries, said David Arakhamia, head of the faction of the ruling Servant of the People party in the Verkhovna Rada.
Russia, the USA, Canada, France, Germany, China, Italy, Poland, Israel and Turkey will become security guarantors. According to Article 5 of the NATO Charter, an attack on one of the members of the alliance is considered an attack on the entire alliance.


According to the FT, Ukraine and its Western allies continue to suspect that Putin is using the talks as a “smoke screen” to regroup forces and send in reinforcements.


Arakhamia confirmed that the parties are close to an agreement on security guarantees and the possibility of Ukraine’s accession to the EU.
At the same time, according to him, it is hardly worth waiting for a breakthrough in the negotiations.


According to Arakhamia, Moscow is demanding that Ukraine recognize its ownership of Crimea and the independence of the two “republics” in the Donbass.
“We will never recognize any borders other than those specified in our Declaration of Independence,” the negotiator stressed. Now, according to the FT, Ukraine is ready to discuss humanitarian issues, including the supply of water to the Crimea, as well as providing guarantees that it will not try to return the peninsula by force.


On March 21, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky
announced that any agreements with Russia would be put to a referendum. “I explained to all the negotiating groups: when you talk about all these changes, and they can be historical, we will not go anywhere, we will come to a referendum. The people will have to say and respond to certain formats of compromise,” he said. this is what they will be – this is already a matter of our conversation and understanding between Ukraine and Russia. Therefore, in any case, I am ready to do anything if this march of mine is with our people.” In an interview with Russian journalists, Zelensky clarified that it would be impossible to hold a referendum without the withdrawal of foreign troops from Ukraine.According to him, the organization and conduct of the referendum will take several months, and amendments to the Ukrainian Constitution will take at least a year.


On Monday, it became known that
Russian oligarch Viktor Abramovich, who was involved as an intermediary, and two members of a Russian negotiating team were poisoned in Kiev on March 3 . Abramovich then lost his sight for several hours. The poisoned had already recovered, Abramovich decided to continue mediation.


Spread the news
Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

Chair Raskin, Ranking Member Mace Request GAO Review of FBI Surveillance of Americans to Protect First Amendment Rights | House Committee on Oversight and Reform

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

Chair Raskin, Ranking Member Mace Request GAO Review of FBI Surveillance of Americans to Protect First Amendment Rights

Mar 7, 2022
Press Release
FBI “Assessments” Allow Bureau to Investigate Groups and Individuals without Evidence of Criminal Wrongdoing

Washington, D.C. (March 7, 2022)—Today, Rep. Jamie Raskin and Rep. Nancy Mace, Chairman and Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, sent a letter to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) requesting that it conduct a comprehensive review of Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) practice of surveilling individuals and groups through activities it classifies as “assessments.”

 

“We are concerned that FBI assessments operate as de facto investigations that can be launched without a factual predicate of criminal wrongdoing,” the Members wrote.  “We ask that GAO examine whether assessments result in the improper monitoring of protected First Amendment activity—including by political, racial, or religious organizations—and whether the FBI has sufficient controls in place to ensure that they do not run afoul of constitutional protections.”

 

In 2008, the Department of Justice (DOJ) revised its guidelines for FBI domestic operations to include a separate category of “assessments,” which require an authorized purpose but do not require a factual basis for the investigation.

 

The updated guidelines allow the FBI to use “intrusive investigative techniques,” including the use of informants and unlimited physical surveillance, on individuals and groups that are not linked to criminal wrongdoing or considered national security threats.  The guidelines also eliminated several procedural checks and have allowed the FBI to use race, religion, or protected speech as factors in choosing targets for assessments.

 

Between 2008 and 2011, the FBI reportedly opened more than 80,000 assessments of individuals and groups but fewer than 3,400 produced information that led to a more intensive investigation.  For example, the Bureau used the 2008 guidelines to carry out a two-year assessment into a group opposed to the Keystone XL Pipeline, and field offices in cities like Ferguson, Missouri repeatedly opened assessments on “black identity extremists” between 2015 and 2018 despite the lack of any known connection between these individuals and violent activity.

 

In today’s letter, the Members requested that GAO conduct a review of the FBI’s use of assessments from December 1, 2008, to the present, including an examination of the individuals and groups targeted by these investigations, and issue a report on its findings.

 

Click here to read the letter to GAO.

 

###

117th Congress

Spread the news
Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

Branding Putin a ‘Butcher’, Biden Doubts Russia Dialing Down Ukraine Aims – The Moscow Times

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
.

U.S. President Joe Biden cast doubt on Russia’s signal that it may scale down its war aims to concentrate on eastern Ukraine, as two Russian missile strikes slammed into the west of the country on Saturday, wounding five.

After failing to break Kyiv’s ferocious resistance in a month of fighting and deadly attacks on civilians, the Russian army in a surprise announcement said it would focus on “the main goal the liberation of Donbas.”

But Biden said he was “not sure” that Moscow has indeed changed strategy, as he branded Russian President Vladimir Putin a “butcher” while meeting Ukrainian refugees in Poland.

The U.S. leader’s assessment came as two missiles struck a fuel depot in western Ukraine’s Lviv, a rare attack on a city just 70 kilometers (45 miles) from the Polish border that has escaped serious fighting since Russian troops invaded last month.

At least five people were wounded, regional governor Maksym Kozytsky said, as AFP journalists in the city center saw plumes of thick black smoke.

Putin sent troops into Ukraine on February 24, vowing to destroy the country’s military and topple pro-Western President Volodymyr Zelensky.

But his army has made little progress on capturing key cities, and its attacks that have hit hospitals, residential buildings and schools have become more deadly.

Biden, who has been leading efforts among Western allies to press Putin to end his invasion of Ukraine, has blasted Putin as a “war criminal” over the assaults on civilians.

The Kremlin hit back at Biden’s description of Putin as a “butcher”, saying “a state leader must remain sober-minded.”

“Such personal insults are narrowing down the window of opportunity for our bilateral relations under the current (U.S.) administration. One should be aware of this,” said Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov, in remarks carried by state news agency TASS.

Unwavering 

Biden, who is on a two-day visit to Poland after holding a series of summits in Brussels with Western allies, earlier met Ukraine’s Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba and Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov in Warsaw in an emphatic show of support for Kyiv.

Both ministers had made a rare trip out of Ukraine for the face-to-face talks, in a possible sign of growing confidence in their fightback against Russian forces.

The talks discussed Washington’s “unwavering commitment to Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity,” State Department spokesperson Ned Price told reporters.

Biden, who later met Polish President Andrzej Duda, also stressed the “sacred commitment” to NATO’s collective defense, in a clear reassurance to Ukraine’s neighbors rattled by the conflict.

“You can count on that… for your freedom and ours,” he told Duda. 

Speaking after visiting Ukrainian refugees later Saturday, Biden said he had been asked by children to pray for their male relatives fighting in Ukraine.

“I remember what it’s like when you have someone in a war zone and every morning you get up and you wonder… you are praying you don’t get that phone call,” said Biden, whose son Beau served in Iraq before dying of a brain tumor.

‘Everybody’s shooting’ 

On the frontlines, Russia’s far-bigger military continued to combat determined Ukrainian defenders who are using Western-supplied weapons from near the capital Kyiv to Kharkiv, the Donbas region and the devastated southern port city of Mariupol.

A humanitarian convoy leaving Mariupol, including ambulances carrying wounded children, was being held up at Russian checkpoints, a Ukrainian official said.

A buildup of several kilometers had formed close to Vassylivka, in the region of Zaporizhzhia where the convoy was headed, said Lyudmyla Denisova, in charge of human rights in Ukraine.

“The ambulances carrying wounded children are also queueing. The people have been deprived of water and food for two days,” she wrote on Telegram, blasting Russian troops for “creating obstacles”.

Authorities have said they fear some 300 civilians in Mariupol may have died in a Russian air strike on a theatre being used as a bomb shelter last week. 

Russian forces hammering Mariupol’s out-gunned resistance consider the city a lynchpin in their attempt to create a land corridor between the Crimea region, which Moscow seized in 2014, and the Donbas.

One Mariupol resident who managed to escape the city, Oksana Vynokurova, described leaving behind complete devastation.

“I have lost all my family. I have lost my house. I am desperate,” the 33-year-old told AFP after reaching Lviv by train.

“My mum is dead. I left my mother in the yard like a dog, because everybody’s shooting.”

In Kharkiv, where local authorities reported 44 artillery strikes and 140 rocket assaults in a single day, residents were resigned to the incessant bombardments.

Anna Kolinichenko, who lives in a three-room flat with her sister and brother-in-law, said they don’t even bother to head down to the cellar when the sirens go off.

“If a bomb drops, we’re going to die anyway,” she said. “We are getting a little used to explosions”. 

Russian forces have taken control of Slavutych, the town where workers at the Chernobyl nuclear plant live, briefly detaining the mayor, regional Ukrainian authorities said.

Residents of the town protested, prompting the invading forces to fire shots in the air and lob stun grenades into the crowd.

Kyiv said it was shortening a planned 35-hour curfew to just Saturday 8:00 pm to Sunday 7:00 am, as Britain’s defense ministry said Ukrainian counter-attacks were underway near the capital.

Ukrainian forces were also attempting to recapture Kherson, the only major city held by Russian invasion troops, a Pentagon official said.

‘Bragging’ 

Russia’s army had been predicted by some to roll across Ukraine with little resistance, but it had greatly underestimated Ukrainian determination. 

Putin’s military has also exhibited poor discipline and morale, faulty equipment and tactics, as well as brutality toward civilians, Western analysts say.

Amid heavy censorship, Russian authorities Friday gave only their second official military death toll since the start of the invasion, at 1,351. 

This is far below Western estimates, with one senior NATO official saying between 7,000 and 15,000 Russian soldiers have died.

Sergei Rudskoi, a senior Russian general, suggested the time had come for a considerably reduced “main goal” of controlling Donbas, an eastern region already partly held by Russian proxies. 

Rudskoi said Ukraine’s military has been severely degraded and that Russia hadn’t seized cities to “prevent destruction and minimize losses among personnel and civilians.”

While diplomatic efforts have so far done little to stop Russia, Zelensky pressed on with his relentless bid to rally world leaders to his side. 

This time taking his message to the Doha Forum meeting in Qatar’s capital, he accused Russia of fuelling a dangerous arms race by “bragging” about its nuclear stocks. 

He also urged Qatar to help stop Moscow from deploying energy as a weapon. 

“I ask you to increase the output of energy to ensure that everyone in Russia understands that no one can use energy as a weapon to blackmail the world,” Zelensky said.


Spread the news
Categories
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

Exclusive: Ukraine’s Defense Intelligence Chief Warns of “Real Hell” for Russians

Spread the news


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from The Nation.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This article originally appeared at TomDispatch.com. To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up to receive the latest updates from <a href=”http://TomDispatch.com” rel=”nofollow”>TomDispatch.com</a>.

A growing chorus of pundits and policy-makers has suggested that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine marks the beginning of a new Cold War. If so, that means trillions of additional dollars for the Pentagon in the years to come coupled with a more aggressive military posture in every corner of the world.

Before this country succumbs to calls for a return to Cold War–style Pentagon spending, it’s important to note that the United States is already spending substantially more than it did at the height of the Korean and Vietnam Wars or, in fact, any other moment in that first Cold War. Even before the invasion of Ukraine began, the Biden administration’s proposed Pentagon budget (as well as related work like nuclear-warhead development at the Department of Energy) was already guaranteed to soar even higher than that, perhaps to $800 billion or more for 2023.

Here’s the irony: Going back to Cold War levels of Pentagon funding would mean reducing, not increasing spending. Of course, that’s anything but what the advocates of such military outlays had in mind, even before the present crisis.

Some supporters of higher Pentagon spending have, in fact, been promoting figures as awe inspiring as they are absurd. Rich Lowry, the editor of the conservative National Review, is advocating a trillion-dollar military budget, while Matthew Kroenig of the Atlantic Council called for the United States to prepare to win simultaneous wars against Russia and China. He even suggested that Congress “could go so far as to double its defense spending” without straining our resources. That would translate into a proposed annual defense budget of perhaps $1.6 trillion. Neither of those astronomical figures is likely to be implemented soon, but that they’re being talked about at all is indicative of where the Washington debate on Pentagon spending is heading in the wake of the Ukraine disaster.

Former government officials are pressing for similarly staggering military budgets. As Reagan-era State Department official and Iran/Contra operative Elliott Abrams argued in a recent Foreign Affairs piece titled “The New Cold War”: “It should be crystal clear now that a larger percentage of GDP [gross domestic product] will need to be spent on defense.” Similarly, in a Washington Post op-ed, former defense secretary Robert Gates insisted that “we need a larger, more advanced military in every branch, taking full advantage of new technologies to fight in new ways.” No matter that the United States already outspends China by a three-to-one margin and Russia by 10-to-one.

Truth be told, current levels of Pentagon spending could easily accommodate even a robust program of arming Ukraine as well as a shift of yet more US troops to Eastern Europe. However, as hawkish voices exploit the Russian invasion to justify higher military budgets, don’t expect that sort of information to get much traction. At least for now, cries for more are going to drown out realistic views on the subject.

Beyond the danger of breaking the budget and siphoning off resources urgently needed to address pressing challenges like pandemics, climate change, and racial and economic injustice, a new Cold War could have devastating consequences. Under such a rubric, the United States would undoubtedly launch yet more military initiatives, while embracing unsavory allies in the name of fending off Russian and Chinese influence.

The first Cold War, of course, reached far beyond Europe, as Washington promoted right-wing authoritarian regimes and insurgencies globally at the cost of millions of lives. Such brutal military misadventures included Washington’s role in coups in Iran, Guatemala, and Chile; the war in Vietnam; and support for repressive governments and proxy forces in Afghanistan, Angola, Central America, and Indonesia. All of those were justified by exaggerated —even at times fabricated—charges of Soviet involvement in such countries and the supposed need to defend “the free world,” a Cold War term President Biden all-too-ominously revived in his recent State of the Union address (assumedly, yet another sign of things to come).

Indeed, his framing of the current global struggle as one between “democracies and autocracies” has a distinctly Cold War ring to it and, like the term “free world,” it’s riddled with contradictions. After all, from Egypt to Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates to the Philippines, all too many autocracies and repressive regimes already receive ample amounts of US weaponry and military training—no matter that they continue to pursue reckless wars or systematically violate the human rights of their own people. Washington’s support is always premised on the role such regimes supposedly play in fighting against or containing the threats of the moment, whether Iran, China, Russia, or some other country.

Count on one thing: The heightened rhetoric about Russia and China seeking to undermine American influence will only reinforce Washington’s support for repressive regimes. The consequences of that could, in turn, prove to be potentially disastrous.

Before Washington embarks on a new Cold War, it’s time to remind ourselves of the global consequences of the last one.

Cold War I: The Coups

Dwight D. Eisenhower is often praised as the president who ended the Korean War and spoke out against the military-industrial complex. However, he also sowed the seeds of instability and repression globally by overseeing the launching of coups against nations allegedly moving towards communism or even simply building closer relations with the Soviet Union.

In 1953, with Eisenhower’s approval, the CIA instigated a coup that led to the overthrow of Prime Minister Mohammed Mosaddeqh. In a now-declassified document, the CIA cited the Cold War and the risks of leaving Iran “open to Soviet aggression” as rationales for their actions. The coup installed Reza Pahlavi as the shah of Iran, initiating 26 years of repressive rule that set the stage for the 1979 Iranian revolution that would bring Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to power.

In 1954, the Eisenhower administration launched a coup that overthrew the Guatemalan government of President Jacobo Arbenz. His “crime”: attempting to redistribute to poor peasants some of the lands owned by major landlords, including the US-based United Fruit Company. Arbenz’s internal reforms were falsely labeled communism-in-the-making and a case of Soviet influence creeping into the Western Hemisphere. Of course, no one in the Eisenhower administration made mention of the close ties between the United Fruit Company and both CIA Director Allen Dulles and his brother, Secretary of State John Foster Dulles. Such US intervention in Guatemala would prove devastating with the four decades that followed consumed by a brutal civil war in which up to 200,000 people died.

In 1973, Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger followed Eisenhower’s playbook by fomenting a coup that overthrew the democratically elected socialist government of Chilean President Salvador Allende, installing the vicious dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet. That coup was accomplished in part through economic warfare —“making the economy scream,” as Secretary of State Henry Kissinger put it—and partly thanks to CIA-backed bribes and assassinations meant to bolster right-wing factions there. Kissinger would justify the coup, which led to the torture, imprisonment, and death of tens of thousands of Chileans, this way: “I don’t see why we need to stand by and watch a country go Communist due to the irresponsibility of its own people.”

Vietnam and Its Legacy

The most devastating Cold War example of a war justified on anti-communist grounds was certainly the disastrous US intervention in Vietnam. It would lead to the deployment there of more than half a million American troops, the dropping of a greater tonnage of bombs than the United States used in World War II, the defoliation of large parts of the Vietnamese countryside, the massacre of villagers in My Lai and numerous other villages, the deaths of 58,000 US troops and up to 2 million Vietnamese civilians—all while Washington systematically lied to the American public about the war’s “progress.”

US involvement in Vietnam began in earnest during the administrations of Presidents Harry Truman and Eisenhower, when Washington bankrolled the French colonial effort there to subdue an independence movement. After a catastrophic French defeat at Dien Bien Phu in 1954, the United States took over the fight, first with covert operations and then counterinsurgency efforts championed by the administration of John F. Kennedy. Finally, under President Lyndon Johnson Washington launched an all-out invasion and bombing campaign.

In addition to being an international crime writ large, in what became a Cold War tradition for Washington, the conflict in Vietnam would prove to be profoundly anti-democratic. There’s no question that independence leader Ho Chi Minh would have won the nationwide election called for by the 1954 Geneva Accords that followed the French defeat. Instead, the Eisenhower administration, gripped by what was then called the “domino theory”—the idea that the victory of communism anywhere would lead other countries to fall like so many dominos to the influence of the Soviet Union—sustained an undemocratic right-wing regime in South Vietnam.

That distant war would, in fact, spark a growing antiwar movement in this country and lead to what became known as the “Vietnam Syndrome,” a public resistance to military intervention globally. While that meant an ever greater reliance on the CIA, it also helped keep the United States out of full-scale boots-on-the-ground conflicts until the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Instead, the post-Vietnam “way of war” would be marked by a series of US-backed proxy conflicts abroad and the widespread arming of repressive regimes.

The defeat in Vietnam helped spawn what was called the Nixon Doctrine, which eschewed large-scale intervention in favor of the arming of American surrogates like the Shah of Iran and the Suharto regime in Indonesia. Those two autocrats typically repressed their own citizens, while trying to extinguish people’s movements in their regions. In the case of Indonesia, Suharto oversaw a brutal war in East Timor, given the green light and supported financially and with weaponry by the Nixon administration.

“Freedom Fighters”

Once Ronald Reagan was elected president in 1981, his administration began to push support for groups he infamously called “freedom fighters.” Those ranged from extremist mujahideen fighters against the Soviets in Afghanistan to Jonas Savimbi’s forces in Angola to the Nicaraguan Contras. The US funding and arming of such groups would have devastating consequences in those countries, setting the stage for the rise of a new generation of corrupt regimes, while arming and training individuals who would become members of Al Qaeda.

The Contras were an armed right-wing rebel movement cobbled together, funded, and supplied by the CIA. Americas Watch accused them of rape, torture, and the execution of civilians. In 1984, Congress prohibited the Reagan administration from funding them, thanks to the Boland amendment (named for Massachusetts Democratic Representative Edward Boland). In response, administration officials sought a work-around. In the end, Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North, a Marine and member of the National Security Council, would devise a scheme to supply arms to Iran, while funneling excess profits from the sales of that weaponry to the Contras. The episode became known as the Iran/Contra scandal and demonstrated the lengths to which zealous Cold Warriors would go to support even the worst actors as long as they were on the “right side” (in every sense) of the Cold War struggle.

Chief among this country’s blunders of that previous Cold War era was its response to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, a policy that still haunts America today. Concerns about that invasion led the administration of President Jimmy Carter to step up weapons transfers through a covert arms pipeline to a loose network of oppositional fighters known as the mujahideen. President Reagan doubled down on such support, even meeting with the leaders of mujahideen groups in the Oval Office in 1983. That relationship would, of course, backfire disastrously as Afghanistan descended into a civil war after the Soviet Union withdrew. Some of those Reagan had praised as “freedom fighters” helped form Al Qaeda and later the Taliban. The United States by no means created the mujahideen in Afghanistan, but it does bear genuine responsibility for everything that followed in that country.

As the Biden administration moves to operationalize its policy of democracy versus autocracy, it should take a close look at the Cold War policy of attempting to expand the boundaries of the “free world.” A study by political scientists Alexander Downes and Jonathon Monten found that, of 28 cases of American regime change, only three would prove successful in building a lasting democracy. Instead, most of the Cold War policies outlined above, even though carried out under the rubric of promoting “freedom” in “the free world,” would undermine democracy in a disastrous fashion.

A New Cold War?

Cold War II, if it comes to pass, is unlikely to simply follow the pattern of Cold War I either in Europe or other parts of the world. Still, the damage done by the “good versus evil” worldview that animated Washington’s policies during the Cold War years should be a cautionary tale. The risk is high that the emerging era could be marked by persistent US intervention or interference in Africa, Asia, and Latin America in the name of staving off Russian and Chinese influence in a world where Washington’s disastrous war on terrorism has never quite ended.

The United States already has more than 200,000 troops stationed abroad, 750 military bases scattered on every continent except Antarctica, and continuing counterterrorism operations in 85 countries. The end of US military involvement in Afghanistan and the dramatic scaling back of American operations in Iraq and Syria should have marked the beginning of a sharp reduction in the US military presence in the Middle East and elsewhere. Washington’s reaction to the Russian invasion of Ukraine may now stand in the way of just such a much-needed military retrenchment.

The “us versus them” rhetoric and global military maneuvering likely to play out in the years to come threaten to divert attention and resources from the biggest risks to humanity, including the existential threat posed by climate change. It also may divert attention from a country—ours—that is threatening to come apart at the seams. To choose this moment to launch a new Cold War should be considered folly of the first order, not to speak of an inability to learn from history.


Spread the news